The Risks Digest

The RISKS Digest

Forum on Risks to the Public in Computers and Related Systems

ACM Committee on Computers and Public Policy, Peter G. Neumann, moderator

Volume 28 Issue 28

Tuesday 30 September 2014

Contents

There's not a creativity deficit in science
Chris Lee via Dewayne Hendricks
"6 challenges 3D printing has yet to overcome"
Anna Gale via Gene Wirchenko
Bug in Bash shell creates big security hole on anything with *nix in it
Lauren Weinstein
New wiretap resistance in iOS 8?
John Gilmore
Re: Wanted: Astronomer with Top Secret Clearance
Whitfield Diffie
Android L will have device encryption on by default
Monty Solomon
Hack runs Android apps on Windows, Mac, and Linux computers
Ars via Monty Solomon
iOS 8: 'Wave' Wireless Microwave Charging Feature for iPad and iPhone is Not Real
Monty Solomon
iOS 8's iCloud Drive reveals the dark side of empowered users
Gene Wirchenko
Reports suggest the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus may bend in your pocket
Andrew Cunningham via Monty Solomon
Russia to be disconnected from the Internet?
Lauren Weinstein
Court blasts US Navy for scanning civilians' computers for child porn
Monty Solomon
Giant MQ-4C Triton surveillance drone flies across the United States
Monty Solomon
"Feds seek expanded PC hacking powers for criminal investigations"
Serdar Yegulalp via Gene Wirchenko
Texas man must pay $40.4M for running Bitcoin-based scam
Ars
US courts agree to restore 10 years of deleted online public records
Ars
FAA bars drone from delivering game ball to college football matchup
Ars
iFixit tears new iPhones apart, finds they're pretty easy to fix
Ars
A not-so-friendly reminder from the gov't: Yelp is not for kids
Ars
Comcast calls rumor that it disconnects Tor users `wildly_inaccurate'
Ars
Apple puts up support page to get U2 album out of your iTunes
Ars
Bill would limit reach of US search warrants for data stored abroad
Ars
Why big data evangelists should be sent to re-education camps
Farooq Butt
The Internet of Thugs
Henry Baker
Jonathan Zittrain
Allow Full Access for "SwiftKey" Keyboards?
Gabe Goldberg
Re: Software ... sends ... Colorado driver's licenses to immigrants
Amos Shapir
Re: zero-day bounties
Patrick O'Beirne
MiniReview: The Design and Implementation of the FreeBSD Operating System by McKusick, Neville-Neil, and Watson
PGN
REVIEW: Georgia Weidman: Penetration Testing
Richard Austin
Info on RISKS (comp.risks)

There's not a creativity deficit in science

Dewayne Hendricks <dewayne@warpspeed.com>
Sat, Sep 20, 2014 at 5:11 PM
Don't use funding application statistics as a proxy for creativity.
Chris Lee, Ars Technica, 20 Sep 2014 (via Dave Farber)
<http://arstechnica.com/science/2014/09/a-creativity-deficit-in-science-no/>

Not so long ago, on a website not so far away, an opinion was expressed:
creativity was being suppressed in science. On the surface, the statistics
support this: younger researchers are getting progressively less of the
funding. Older researchers, it is asserted, tend to propose less risky and
less innovative research. As with any good opinion in science, Nobel prize
winners are wheeled as supporting cast. But, is it really true? Are we truly
suppressing the creative side of science?

The answer is, overwhelmingly, no. Scientific papers are a crude measure for
scientific progress, but never have more papers being produced per year than
now. Clearly, something creative is going on here. If you don't like
scientific papers, simply look at technological progress: your smartphone
would not have nearly as much punch without the creativity of scientists;
antiviral drugs were not found lying about on the ground; experimental
stem-cell therapies were not accidentally attempted. Behind all of these new
things lies a decade or more of scientific research. But, you know, thats
not creative at all.  [...  PGN truncated for RISKS.]


"6 challenges 3D printing has yet to overcome" (Anna Gale)

Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net>
Mon, 22 Sep 2014 10:00:18 -0700
This is the first article that I have seen that mentions some interesting
downsides/risks about 3-D printing:

Anna Gale, Fueled, via *IT Business*, 19 Sep 2014
http://www.itbusiness.ca/blog/6-challenges-3d-printing-has-yet-to-overcome/51152


Bug in Bash shell creates big security hole on anything with *nix in it

Lauren Weinstein <lauren@vortex.com>
Wed, 24 Sep 2014 15:02:36 -0700
Bug in Bash shell creates big security hole on anything with *nix in it
Could allow attackers to execute code on Linux, Unix, and Mac OS X
Ars Technica via NNSquad

http://arstechnica.com/security/2014/09/bug-in-bash-shell-creates-big-security-hole-on-anything-with-nix-in-it/

  "The bug, discovered by Stephane Schazelas, is related to how Bash
  processes environmental variables passed by the operating system or by a
  program calling a Bash-based script. If Bash has been configured as the
  default system shell, it can be used by network-based attackers against
  servers and other Unix and Linux devices via Web requests, secure shell,
  telnet sessions, or other programs that use Bash to execute scripts."


New wiretap resistance in iOS 8? (from Cryptography)

John Gilmore <gnu@toad.com>
Saturday, September 20, 2014
  [ORIGINAL SOURCES:
  Jonathan Zdziarski, 17 Sep 2014
  http://www.zdziarski.com/blog/?p875

  Cyrus Farivar, Ars Technica, 18 Sep 2014
  Apple expands data encryption under iOS 8, making handover to cops moot
  "Apple cannot bypass your passcode and therefore cannot access this data."
  http://arstechnica.com/apple/2014/09/apple-expands-data-encryption-under-ios-8-making-handover-to-cops-moot/
  PGN]

> Quoting from the new iOS 8 privacy policy announced tonight 17 Sep 2014.
>> Apple has no way to decrypt iMessage and FaceTime data when it's in
>> transit between devices. So unlike other companies' messaging services,
>> Apple doesn't scan your communications, and we wouldn't be able to comply
>> with a wiretap order even if we wanted to.
>> https://www.apple.com/privacy/privacy-built-in/

And why do we believe them?

  *  Because we can read the source code and the protocol descriptions
     ourselves, and determine just how secure they are?

  *  Because they're a big company and big companies never lie?

  *  Because they've implemented it in proprietary binary software,
     and proprietary crypto is always stronger than the company
     claims it to be?

  *  Because they can't covertly send your device updated software that
     would change all these promises, for a targeted individual, or on
     a mass basis?

  *  Because you will never agree to upgrade the software on your
     device, ever, no matter how often they send you updates?

  *  Because this first release of their encryption software has no
     security bugs, so you will never need to upgrade it to retain
     your privacy?

  *  Because if a future update INSERTS privacy or security bugs, we
     will surely be able to distinguish these updates from future
     updates that FIX privacy or security bugs?

  *  Because if they change their mind and decide to lessen our privacy
     for their convenience, or by secret government edict, they will
     be sure to let us know?

  *  Because they have worked hard for years to prevent you from
     upgrading the software that runs on their devices so that YOU can
     choose it and control it instead of them?

  *  Because the US export control bureaucracy would never try to stop
     Apple from selling secure mass market proprietary encryption
     products across the border?

  *  Because the countries that wouldn't let Blackberry sell phones
     that communicate securely with your own corporate servers,
     will of course let Apple sell whatever high security non-tappable
     devices it wants to?

  *  Because we're apple fanboys and the company can do no wrong?

  *  Because they want to help the terrorists win?

  *  Because NSA made them mad once, therefore they are on the side
     of the public against NSA?

  *  Because it's always better to wiretap people after you convince
     them that they are perfectly secure, so they'll spill all their
     best secrets?

There must be some other reason, I'm just having trouble thinking of it.


Re: Wanted: Astronomer with Top Secret Clearance (via Dave Farber)

Whitfield Diffie <whitfield.diffie@gmail.com>
Tue, Sep 16, 2014 at 7:37 AM
John Gilmore:
  The main answer is that the inmates have taken over the asylum, ...

Although I am in general agreement with John's outrage over the government's
discovery that secrecy in many forms can protect it from oversight ---
national security classification is only one of these; privacy is also a
great excuse for keeping things secret from the electorate --- I don't find
the need for a clearance for the director of the James Webb telescope
surprising.

The first thing that comes to mind is my recollection that the problem with
the Hubble telescope's mirrors was attributed to NASA's being unable to use
existing machinery for testing them because it was classified.  The range of
areas in which a major project like the James Webb telescope brushes against
secret technologies is broad.

I believe an astronomical telescope cannot be pointed at the Earth because
the Earth is too bright.  As John point's out, however, there are other,
much dimmer, objects like other people's spacecraft that it perhaps can look
at.  It also works the other way around.  The first space shuttle was looked
at by spy satellites to assess the status of its tiles; somehow they had
forgotten they could do this by the time tile damage was suspected but not
investigated on Columbia or perhaps the spy satellites did see damage to
Columbia's wing tiles and either didn't tell NASA or just didn't tell us.

The technology of the James Webb telescope must be closely related to that
of the spy satellites.  Giving the director an SI clearance doesn't
guarantee NASA access to all relevant technology or the assistance of the
agencies and companies that have it but I don't see any chance of that
without it.


Android L will have device encryption on by default

Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com>
Sun, 21 Sep 2014 00:58:21 -0400
http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2014/09/android-l-will-have-device-encryption-on-by-default/


Hack runs Android apps on Windows, Mac, and Linux computers

Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com>
Sun, 21 Sep 2014 01:27:43 -0400
http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2014/09/hack-runs-android-apps-on-windows-mac-and-linux-computers/


iOS 8: 'Wave' Wireless Microwave Charging Feature for iPad and iPhone is Not Real

Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com>
Tue, 23 Sep 2014 09:26:11 -0400
A new hoax is quickly spreading across social media platforms that claims
that the new iOS 8 update will help users wirelessly charge their iPhones
and iPads with the help of a household microwave. Users should understand
that this claim is false and that they will most definitely blow up their
iOS device if they try this.

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/ios-8-wave-wireless-microwave-charging-feature-ipad-iphone-not-real-1466446


iOS 8's iCloud Drive reveals the dark side of empowered users

Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net>
Tue, 23 Sep 2014 17:33:03 -0700
http://www.infoworld.com/article/2686976/consumerization-of-it/ios-8-reveals-the-dark-side-of-empowered-users.html
iOS 8's iCloud Drive reveals the dark side of empowered users
Apple's iCloud Drive deployment was sure to mess up people's access
to documents—and it did
InfoWorld | Sep 23, 2014


Reports suggest the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus may bend in your pocket

Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com>
Wed, 24 Sep 2014 03:25:33 -0400
The new phones are thin, but it might make them more flexible than intended.

Andrew Cunningham, Ars Technica, 23 Sep 2014
http://arstechnica.com/apple/2014/09/reports-suggest-the-iphone-6-and-6-plus-may-bend-under-pressure/


Russia to be disconnected from the Internet?

Lauren Weinstein <lauren@vortex.com>
Fri, 19 Sep 2014 11:56:34 -0700
Pravda via NNSquad
http://english.pravda.ru/society/stories/19-09-2014/128572-russia_internet-0/

  "According to various reports, the officials will make a number of
  decisions regulating the use of the Internet in Russia, providing for the
  ability to cut the Russian Internet, known as Runet, from the outside
  world, in case of emergency."

You know—emergencies—like Czar Putin trying to do a Stalin on his
own people.


Court blasts US Navy for scanning civilians' computers for child porn

Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com>
Mon, 15 Sep 2014 21:57:25 -0400
Every Gnutella user in the state of Washington was checked by the NCIS.

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2014/09/court-blasts-us-navy-for-scanning-civilians-computers-for-child-porn/


Giant MQ-4C Triton surveillance drone flies across the United States

Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com>
Sun, 21 Sep 2014 01:05:05 -0400
http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2014/09/giant-mq-4c-triton-surveillance-drone-flies-across-the-united-states/


"Feds seek expanded PC hacking powers for criminal investigations" (Serdar Yegulalp)

Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net>
Thu, 18 Sep 2014 14:41:52 -0700
Serdar Yegulalp, InfoWorld | 17 Sep 2014
The FBI and Department of Justice are mulling rules that would allow
broader opportunities for domestic law enforcement to hack PCs as
part of a criminal investigation
http://www.infoworld.com/article/2684796/government/feds-seek-expanded-pc-hacking-powers-for-criminal-investigations.html


Texas man must pay $40.4M for running Bitcoin-based scam

Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com>
Sun, 21 Sep 2014 01:32:04 -0400
http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2014/09/texas-man-must-pay-40-4m-for-running-bitcoin-based-scam-court-rules/


US courts agree to restore 10 years of deleted online public records

Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com>
Sun, 21 Sep 2014 01:30:18 -0400
http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2014/09/us-courts-agree-to-restore-10-years-of-deleted-online-public-records/


FAA bars drone from delivering game ball to college football matchup

Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com>
Sun, 21 Sep 2014 01:30:57 -0400
http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2014/09/faa-bars-drone-from-delivering-game-ball-to-college-football-matchup/


iFixit tears new iPhones apart, finds they're pretty easy to fix

Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com>
Sun, 21 Sep 2014 01:25:26 -0400
http://arstechnica.com/apple/2014/09/ifixit-tears-new-iphones-apart-finds-theyre-pretty-easy-to-fix/


A not-so-friendly reminder from the gov't: Yelp is not for kids

Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com>
Sun, 21 Sep 2014 01:29:10 -0400
http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2014/09/a-not-so-friendly-reminder-from-the-govt-yelp-is-not-for-kids/


Comcast calls rumor that it disconnects Tor users `wildly_inaccurate'

Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com>
Mon, 15 Sep 2014 21:54:35 -0400
http://arstechnica.com/business/2014/09/comcast-calls-rumor-that-it-disconnects-tor-users-wildly-inaccurate/


Apple puts up support page to get U2 album out of your iTunes (Ars)

Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com>
Mon, 15 Sep 2014 22:00:28 -0400
Apple puts up support page to get U2 album out of your iTunes
Too many people don't want U2 anywhere near their libraries.

http://arstechnica.com/apple/2014/09/apple-puts-up-support-page-to-get-u2-album-out-of-your-itunes/


Bill would limit reach of US search warrants for data stored abroad

Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com>
Sun, 21 Sep 2014 01:26:34 -0400
http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2014/09/bill-would-limit-reach-of-us-search-warrants-for-data-stored-abroad/


Why big data evangelists should be sent to re-education camps

"Farooq Butt" <farooq@farooqbutt.com>
Sep 20, 2014 7:12 PM
  (via Dave Farber)

http://www.zdnet.com/why-big-data-evangelists-should-be-sent-to-re-education-camps-7000033862/


The Internet of Thugs

Henry Baker <hbaker1@pipeline.com>
Wed, 24 Sep 2014 20:45:36 -0700
Cory Doctorow's worst fears w.r.t. repossessed Internet-enabled devices are
now being realized.

Perhaps this is what Jonathan Zittrain had in mind with his "kill switches
for weaponry": "if you just make that next payment to the
U.S. military-industrial complex secret account in Switzerland, we'll
restore power to your tank/fighter-jet/etc. so that you can continue killing
your own citizens.  Thank you for your business!"

What next?  Internet-enabled Ebola medicines ?  "Please remit $10 million to
the Big Pharma secret lobbying slush fund, so that we can send you the Ebola
medicine enable code.  We're sorry for the temporary inconvenience."

Michael Corkery and Jessica Silver-Greenberg
Miss a Payment?  Good Luck Moving That Car
*The New York Times*, 24 Sep 2014 [pruned starkly for RISKS]
http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2014/09/24/miss-a-payment-good-luck-moving-that-car/


Re: The Internet of Thugs (Baker, RISKS-28.28)

Jonathan Zittrain <zittrain@law.harvard.edu>
Thu, 25 Sep 2014 09:39:48 -0400
FWIW, Cory's fears are my fears on this.  And in
the consumer space, self-stopping (rather than
self-driving) cars are only the beginning.

But I find many differences between the Internet-enabled shift from product
to service among consumers—something I wrote about at length at
<http://yupnet.org/zittrain/archives/14>—and an army ready to do awful
things with weapons, perhaps stopped by the heavy weapons' refusing to work
for anyone able to simply get hands on them.  The power dynamics are
inverted in the second example.


Allow Full Access for "SwiftKey" Keyboards?

Gabe Goldberg <gabe@gabegold.com>
Wed, 24 Sep 2014 20:39:40 -0400
Why not? "Full access allows the developer of this keyboard to transmit
anything you type, including things you have previously typed with this
keyboard. This could include sensitive information such as your credit card
number or street address." ...

Head to your Settings app, then go to General > Keyboard > Keyboards.
Choose to add a new keyboard, and pick it from the list of third-party
keyboards. Finally, tap the new keyboard's name and choose to Allow Full
Access (not required for Swype).

You'll get a warning message about this, but it's required by the operating
system. Obviously, a keyboard can theoretically collect everything you type
into it; rest assured that well-known developers are keeping your info safe.

http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/ios-8-lets-replace-iphone-ipads-keyboard-heres/

Well-known developers ALWAYS keep us safe. What could possibly go wrong with
this?


Re: Software ... sends ... Colorado driver's licenses to immigrants

Amos Shapir <amos083@gmail.com>
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 17:00:02 +0300
IMHO the trouble is caused by using driver licenses where a "voter license"
would be required—namely, a national citizen's ID card.

The insistence on not to institute any form of an official ID card had
resulted in using a driver license in most cases, which leads to such
contraptions as a "non-driving license" which is used as an ID and issued by
the DMV in some states, although it has nothing to do with driving.

Since states and the federal government manage every other aspect of voting,
why wouldn't they also manage voters identification?


Re: zero-day bounties (Edwards, RISKS-28.27)

"Patrick O'Beirne" <pob@sysmod.com>
Tue, 16 Sep 2014 08:57:18 +0100
That article considers rework and test costs versus loss of income.
There are two other risks to bugs:

Cost of damage from failure (e.g., misleading information leading to damage
to reputation or even worse to customers), and/or loss of revenue, e.g.,
mispricing.


The Design and Implementation of the FreeBSD Operating System

"Peter G. Neumann" <neumann@csl.sri.com>
Thu, 25 Sep 2014 9:51:15 PDT
Marshall Kirk McKusick, George V. Neville-Neil, and Robert N.M. Watson
The Design and Implementation of the FreeBSD Operating System
Second edition, Addison-Wesley 2015
xxx + 886 + some useful unnumbered pages on videos and course materials

Excerpted from the preface:

  This book is about the internal structure of the FreeBSD 11 kernel and the
  concepts, data structures, and algorithms used in implementing FreeBD's
  system facilities.  The book covers FreeBSD from the system-call level
  down—from the interface to the kernel to the hardware itself.  The
  kernel includes system facilities, such as process management, security,
  virtual memory, the I/O system, filesystems, the *socket* IPC mechanism,
  and network protocol implementations.

This is a truly extraordinary book—extremely well written, comprehensive,
incisive, and timely.  It seems to have something for everyone—software
developers, administrators, students, and others hungry for a single source
for a wide range of considerable knowledge and experience that is highly
relevant.  The second edition has roughly 1/3 completely new text and 1/3 of
the earlier text extensively rewritten, It can serve as a reference book, as
well as a valuable source for operating systems courses.

One of the major new additions in the 2nd edition is a chapter by Robert
Watson on security, which includes more conventional topics such as
discretionary/mandatory access control, audit, etc, but also more
contemporary topics such as Capsicum, disk encryption, and so on.  This new
chapter may be of particular interest to RISKS readers.

Whereas FreeBSD is used in its own right as a server OS, it is also an
open-source operating-system foundation for systems as varied as Mac OS X
and Apple iOS, NetApp's OnTap GX, EMC/Isilon appliances, Juniper Junos, and
the Sony Playstation.  Therefore, its security should be highly relevant to
RISKS readers.

Note: The preface says `FreeBSD 11'.  The book does describe things that
will ship with FreeBSD 11, but is also relevant for the existing FreeBSD 10.


REVIEW: Georgia Weidman: Penetration Testing (Richard Austin)

"Cipher Editor" <cipher-editor@ieee-security.org>
Thu, 25 Sep 2014 09:49:25 -0600
Newsletter of the IEEE Computer Society's TC on Security and Privacy
Electronic Issue 122                                      September 25, 2014
Hilarie Orman, Editor                           Sven Dietrich, Assoc. Editor
cipher-editor @ ieee-security.org    cipher-assoc-editor @ ieee-security.org

Richard Austin                                                     Yong Guan
Book Review Editor                                           Calendar Editor
cipher-bookrev @ ieee-security.org            cipher-cfp @ ieee-security.org

The newsletter is also at http://www.ieee-security.org/cipher.html
Cipher is published 6 times per year

Book Review by Richard Austin, 16 Sep 2014

Georgia Weidman: Penetration Testing: A Hands-On Introduction to Hacking
No Starch Press 2014
ISBN 978-1-59327-564-8
Amazon.com USD 28.11
Table of Contents:  http://www.nostarch.com/pentesting#toc

When the publication announcement for this book arrived in my EMAIL, my
first response was "Not another pen-testing book!" and I gazed at the table
of contents with rather of a jaundiced eye.  As you have probably noticed, I
have a fondness for books that require you to "do" as you read and Weidman's
chapters on setting up a virtual lab and introducing Kali Linux piqued my
interest enough to start reading.

Weidman wasted no time in starting to rack up credibility points as she
noted that in a penetration test, you simulate attacks by actually
EXPLOITING vulnerabilities rather than just identifying them (Chapter 0).
Then on page 3, she earned her "veteran" status by noting that even a simple
port scan of a device's management port can knock them off the air (in my
experience by crashing the on-board web server).

To avoid this becoming just another catalog of tools and dialogs, the reader
will definitely want to follow the procedures in Chapter 1 to set up the
virtual lab for the book.  Weidman makes use of Kali Linux which has an
arsenal of tools already installed and avoids much time wandering the
"dependency maze" in getting the tools to run. She wisely recommends that
you use the Kali version available on the book website so that her
walkthroughs will match the tool versions.  Chapters 2 through 4 provide a
brief introduction to Kali, scripting and the Metasploit framework that
prepare you for the detailed walkthroughs in later chapters.

With preliminaries out of the way, Weidman devotes the next three chapters
to the assessment phase of the penetration test.  It's a pretty standard
presentation of the usual tools (whois, nmap, Nessus, Metasploit, etc.) with
accompanying introductory walkthroughs in the virtual lab environment.

The next eight chapters are devoted to attacks, and this is where Weidman
starts to shine.  She makes the solid point that in a penetration test, you
have to go beyond identifying a vulnerability and actually exploit it where
possible.  And, most importantly, after a successful exploit, you have to do
something interesting (interesting to you as the pen-tester but damaging to
the customer if actually done by an adversary).

The catalog of attack methods is quite comprehensive and goes beyond the
usual exploitation of technical vulnerabilities and cracking passwords to
client-side attacks, social engineering (using SET. the Social Engineer
Toolkit) and evading anti-virus.  Chapter 13, "Post Exploitation", is highly
recommended for its coverage (and walkthrough) of how to capitalize on an
initial foothold to achieve further access within the infrastructure.  She
rounds out her survey of attacks with coverage of web applications (notable
for illustrating use of the Burp proxy) and wireless.

Weidman's next the important topic of "Exploit Development", and she spends
four chapters covering stack-based buffer overflows, SEH (Structured
Exception Handler) overwrites, fuzzing and development of Metasploit modules
for new vulnerabilities.  This section provides a concise, all-in-one-place
overview of these essential topics.

The final chapter covers Weidman's personal specialty: attacking mobile
devices.  As these wandering gateways into our infrastructures and
repositories of proprietary data have become increasingly common, their
value to our adversaries has correspondingly increased.  Weidman's coverage
of how these devices are attacked and use of her "Smartphone Pentest
Framework" are a valuable addition to the knowledge base of the practicing
security professional.  The walkthroughs are done using emulators, so
there's no need to risk "bricking" a real device when following along with
the text.

Through I started out with reservations about the need for
yet-another-pen-testing-book, Weidman's presentation has much to recommend
it to the technical security professional.  No book is ever going to make
one into a successful penetration tester but careful study and time invested
in following her walkthroughs will provide increased understanding of the
pen-tester's craft and appreciation of our adversaries' use of similar
techniques in the field.  Definitely a recommended read.

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