The Risks Digest

The RISKS Digest

Forum on Risks to the Public in Computers and Related Systems

ACM Committee on Computers and Public Policy, Peter G. Neumann, moderator

Volume 29 Issue 74

Friday 2 September 2016

Contents

Voice Pitch and Voting Patterns
Casey Klofstad et al.
"Hackers had a chance to hamper voting by deleting records"
Michael Kan
We should be worried about the hacking of electronic voting machines
Lieberman/Finkelstein
Hacking elections is easy!
CyberAttackSquad
2016 US financial cyber security
Security Score Card
New hacking technique stealthily changes memory of virtual servers
HomelandSecurityNewswire
Facebook exposes identity of psychiatric patients
Fusion.Net
Staff breach at OneLogin exposes password storage feature
CSO
SWIFT Discloses More Cyber Thefts, Pressures Banks on Security
NYTimes
Dropbox hack leads to leaking of 68m user passwords on The Internet
The Guardian
43 million passwords hacked in Last.fm breach
John Mannes via Sam Wood
Check whether you have an account that has been pwned
Sam Wood
"This data-stealing Trojan is the first to also infect you with ransomware"
Danny Palmer
New cloud attack takes full control of virtual machines with little effort
Ars Technica
Kimpton Payment Card Incident
Kimpton
"Poisoned Word docs deploy rogue web proxies to hijack your encrypted traffic"
Lucian Constantin
"Kaspersky fixes antivirus crash bug"
Zack Whittaker
"Google won't fix login page flaw that can lead to malware download"
Zack Whittaker
Half of people click anything sent to them
Ars Technica
"Perth cop accessed restricted computer"
Aimee Chanthadavong
"Update: Apple must repay $14.5B in underpaid taxes in Ireland"
Peter Sayer
How Tech Giants Are Devising Real Ethics for Artificial Intelligence
John Markoff
"Kawasaki developing AI motorcycles that can talk with, learn from their riders"
Casey Baseel
You Can Now Chat With Your Hotel Room, and It's Only Going to Get Better
Bloomberg
AP Computer Science Principles Course Aims to Attract More Students to the Field
Amy Golod
Feist vs Paxfire
PGN
Choice Hotels: Beyond CAPTCHAs to frustration
Jeremy Epstein
How One GMO Nearly Took Down the Planet
Gabe Goldberg
Re: They really did remove the streets from Google Maps
Al Stangenberger
Info on RISKS (comp.risks)

Voice Pitch and Voting Patterns (Casey Klofstad et al.)

"Peter G. Neumann" <neumann@csl.sri.com>
Thu, 1 Sep 2016 9:23:19 PDT
Casey A. Klofstad, Stephen Nowicki and Rindy C, Anderson
How Voice Pitch Influences Our Choice of Leaders
*American Scientist*, September-October 2016, pages 282--287

When candidates speak, their vocal characteristics—as well as
  their words—influence voters' attitudes toward them

Boxed summaries:

* Research subjects, both male and female, preferred a lower-pitched
  voice, whether the candidate was female or male.

* Does the language-processing circuitry of the human brain
  deal with meaning apart from intonation?

Fascinating article.  PGN


"Hackers had a chance to hamper voting by deleting records" (Michael Kan)

Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net>
Tue, 30 Aug 2016 11:47:03 -0700
Michael Kan, Computerworld, 30 Aug 2016
In June, attackers managed to steal administrative login credentials
from a county official in the U.S.
http://www.computerworld.com/article/3113707/security/hackers-had-a-chance-to-hamper-voting-by-deleting-records.html

opening text:

A U.S. cybersecurity monitor on Monday described another breach of a voter
election system just after a leaked FBI report revealed two similar attacks.
In June, anonymous hackers stole administrative login credentials in an
unnamed county that would have let them delete voter registration records
and prevent citizens from casting ballots.

http://www.cso.com.au/article/605914/hackers-had-chance-hamper-voting-by-deleting-records/


We should be worried about the hacking of electronic voting machines (Lieberman/Finkelstein)

"Peter G. Neumann" <neumann@csl.sri.com>
Thu, 2 Sep 2016 14:13:07 PDT
Dan Lieberman and Russ Finkelstein, Fusion.net, 31 Aug 2016

This item from Fusion TV (with a short news clip) on hackable touchscreen
voting machines reminds us why optical-scan paper ballots seem much better.
It also notes Andrew Appel hacking into a paperless touch-screen voting
machine in seven minutes.

http://fusion.net/story/342741/hacking-electronic-voting-machines-election-2016/


Hacking elections is easy! (CyberAttackSquad)

"Peter G. Neumann" <neumann@csl.sri.com>
Tue, 30 Aug 2016 10:18:45 PDT
http://cyberattacksquad.com/icit-analysis-hacking-elections-is-easy-part-one-tactics-techniques-and-procedures/


2016 US financial cyber security (Security Score Card)

"Alister Wm Macintyre \(Wow\)" <macwheel99@wowway.com>
Mon, 29 Aug 2016 20:57:57 -0500
Did you know that

* Only 1 out of the top 20 U.S. banks has an 'A' grade in cybersecurity?
* 75%, of the top 20 US commercial banks, are afflicted with malware?

http://info.securityscorecard.com/2016-financial-cybersecurity-report
(Registration required)

Security Scorecard analyzed 7,111 US financial institutions to find the most
critical vulnerabilities and security weaknesses within investment banks,
asset management firms, and major commercial banks in the United States.


New hacking technique stealthily changes memory of virtual servers

Dewayne Hendricks <dewayne@warpspeed.com>
Wed, Aug 31, 2016 at 1:27 PM
[Note:  This item comes from friend Gary Rimar.  DLH]
  <via Geoff Goodfellow as well.  PGN>

New hacking technique stealthily changes memory of virtual servers,
12 Aug 2016

<http://www.homelandsecuritynewswire.com/dr20160812-new-hacking-technique-stealthily-changes-memory-of-virtual-servers>

For the first time ever a team of Dutch hacking experts managed to alter the
memory of virtual machines in the cloud without a software bug, using a new
attack technique.

With this technique an attacker can crack the keys of secured virtual
machines or install malware without it being noticed. It is a new
de-duplication-based attack in which data can not only be viewed and leaked,
but also modified using a hardware glitch. By doing so the attacker can
order the server to install malicious and unwanted software or allow logins
by unauthorized persons.

De-duplication and Rowhammer bug VUA notes that with the new attack
technique Flip Feng Shui (FSS), an attacker rents a virtual machine on the
same host as the victim. This can be done by renting many virtual machines
until one of them lands next to the victim. A virtual machine in the cloud
is often used to run applications, test new software, or run a Web
site. There are public (for everyone), community (for a select group), and
private (for one organization accessible) clouds. The attacker writes a
memory page that he knows exists in the victim on the vulnerable memory
location and lets it de-duplicate. As a result, the identical pages will be
merged into one in order to save space (the information is, after all, the
same). That page is stored in the same part of the memory of the physical
computer. The attacker can now modify the information in the general memory
of the computer. This can be done by triggering a hardware bug dubbed
Rowhammer, which causes flip bits from 0 to 1 or vice versa, to seek out the
vulnerable memory cells and change them.

Cracking OpenSSH

The researchers of the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, who worked together
with a researcher from the Catholic University of Leuven, describe in their
research two attacks on the operating systems Debian and Ubuntu. The first
FFS attack gained access to the virtual machines through weakening OpenSSH
public keys.  The attacker did this by changing the victim's public key in
one bit.  In the second attack, the settings of the software management
application apt were adjusted by making minor changes to the URL from where
apt downloads software. The server could then install malware that presents
itself as a software update. The integrity check could be circumvented by
making a small change to the public key that verifies the integrity of the
apt-get software packages. [...]


Facebook exposes identity of psychiatric patients

Mark Thorson <eee@sonic.net>
Wed, 31 Aug 2016 14:10:23 -0700
Not quite clear how this happened, but cellphone locations are suspected.

http://fusion.net/story/339018/facebook-psychiatrist-privacy-problems/


Staff breach at OneLogin exposes password storage feature

Lauren Weinstein <lauren@vortex.com>
Wed, 31 Aug 2016 20:50:09 -0700
  [via NNSquad]
http://www.cso.com.au/article/606069/staff-breach-onelogin-exposes-password-storage-feature/

  Several thousand enterprise customers, including high profile tech
  startups, use OneLogin for single sign-on to access enterprise cloud
  applications. The company has championed the SAML standard for single
  sign-on and promises customers an easy way to enable multi-factor
  authentication from devices to cloud applications. But it appears the
  company wasn't using multi-factor authentication for its own systems.


SWIFT Discloses More Cyber Thefts, Pressures Banks on Security

Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com>
Wed, 31 Aug 2016 01:36:12 -0400
http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2016/08/30/business/30reuters-cyber-heist-swift.html

SWIFT disclosed new hacking attacks on its member banks, on the heels of
February's high-profile $81 million heist at Bangladesh Bank.


Dropbox hack leads to leaking of 68m user passwords on The Internet

Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com>
Thu, 1 Sep 2016 08:56:05 -0400
Dropbox hack leads to leaking of 68m user passwords on The Internet
Data stolen in 2012 breach, containing encrypted passwords and details of
around two-thirds of cloud firm's customers, has been leaked.
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/aug/31/dropbox-hack-passwords-68m-data-breach

  [This is just coming out now?  The hack occurred four years ago, in 2012.
  Their advice: change your password!  <So it can be hacked anew --
  assuming the vulnerabilities still exist?> PGN]


43 million passwords hacked in Last.fm breach (John Mannes)

Sam Wood <samuel.wood@sri.com>
Fri, 2 Sep 2016 07:18:45 +0000
TechCrunch.com, 1 Sep 2016.  This hack occurred in March 2012, according to
LeakedSource, "MD5 is seriously out of style. ... Moreover, Last.fm didn't
use salt in its hashing process."
https://techcrunch.com/2016/09/01/43-million-passwords-hacked-in-last-fm-breach/

"For the second time this week, our advice is that you change your password
immediately...  The most popular password pulled from the Last.fm database
was 123456.  Seriously, it's 2016 people—use a platform like LastPast to
generate randomized, complex passwords that are unique to every service for
which you sign up."

  [This is just coming out now?  The hack occurred four years ago, in 2012.
  Their advice: change your password!  <So it can be hacked anew --
  assuming the vulnerabilities still exist?> PGN]


Check whether you have an account that has been pwned

Sam Wood <samuel.wood@sri.com>
Fri, 2 Sep 2016 07:18:45 +0000
  https://haveibeenpwned.com

  [As I am typing this, their website shows 129 websites and
  1,388,845.883 accounts that have been pwned!  PGN]


"This data-stealing Trojan is the first to also infect you with ransomware" (Danny Palmer)

Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net>
Fri, 02 Sep 2016 10:22:49 -0700
Danny Palmer, ZDnet, 2 Sep 2016
Not content with stealing your bank details, Betabot will also infect
your computer with Cerber ransomware too.
http://www.zdnet.com/article/this-data-stealing-trojan-malware-is-the-first-to-also-infect-you-with-ransomware/


New cloud attack takes full control of virtual machines with little effort (Ars Technica)

Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com>
Thu, 1 Sep 2016 09:08:43 -0400
http://arstechnica.com/security/2016/08/new-attack-steals-private-crypto-keys-by-corrupting-data-in-computer-memory/


Kimpton Payment Card Incident

Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com>
Thu, 1 Sep 2016 09:12:17 -0400
Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants Notifies Customers of Payment Card Incident
https://www.kimptonhotels.com/promos/payment-card-notification


"Poisoned Word docs deploy rogue web proxies to hijack your encrypted traffic" (Lucian Constantin)

Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net>
Tue, 30 Aug 2016 10:52:01 -0700
Lucian Constantin, PC World, 30 Aug 2016
The new attack uses Word documents loaded with malicious code
http://www.pcworld.com/article/3114066/security/attackers-deploy-rogue-proxies-on-computers-to-hijack-https-traffic.html

opening text:

Security researchers have highlighted in recent months how the web proxy
configuration in browsers and operating systems can be abused to steal
sensitive user data. It seems that attackers are catching on.

A new attack spotted and analyzed by malware researchers from Microsoft uses
Word documents with malicious code that doesn't install traditional malware,
but instead configures browsers to use a web proxy controlled by attackers.


"Kaspersky fixes antivirus crash bug" (Zack Whittaker)

Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net>
Tue, 30 Aug 2016 11:17:45 -0700
Zack Whittaker for Zero Day, ZDnet, 29 Aug 2016
The denial-of-service flaws could be used to install malware.
http://www.zdnet.com/article/kaspersky-fixes-antivirus-crash-bug/


"Google won't fix login page flaw that can lead to malware download" (Zack Whittaker)

Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net>
Tue, 30 Aug 2016 11:32:55 -0700
Zack Whittaker for Zero Day, ZDnet, 30 Aug 2016
The company said the possible security issue is limited to Google domains.
http://www.zdnet.com/article/google-wont-fix-login-page-flaw-can-lead-to-malware-download/

selected text:

Google has said it will not fix a potential security flaw that could trick a
user into downloading malware from its login window.  But Google said that
the redirect page has to fall within "*google.com" domains, limiting its
impact.

The problem, said Woods, is that malware hosted on "drive.google.com" or
"docs.google.com" which fall within the Google subdomain parameters could
still be used to serve up malware, and hide it as a genuine Google login
page.


Half of people click anything sent to them

Monty Solomon <monty@roscom.com>
Thu, 1 Sep 2016 09:14:51 -0400
So much for counter-phishing training: Half of people click anything sent to
them.
http://arstechnica.com/security/2016/08/researchers-demonstrate-half-of-people-will-click-on-any-link-theyre-sent/


"Perth cop accessed restricted computer" (Aimee Chanthadavong)

Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net>
Fri, 02 Sep 2016 10:20:31 -0700
Aimee Chanthadavong, ZDnet 2 Sep 2016
A 30-year-old Perth constable will remain on duty, despite being
charged for allegedly accessing a restricted computer.
http://www.zdnet.com/article/perth-cop-accessed-restricted-computer/

  [There is more in the article than the title and blurb imply.]

Final paragraph:

In a recent report by the Queensland CCC [Crime and Corruption Commission],
it revealed the Queensland Police made up 67 percent of the around 400
allegations of information misuse in the state during 2014-15.


"Update: Apple must repay $14.5B in underpaid taxes in Ireland" (Peter Sayer)

Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net>
Tue, 30 Aug 2016 11:44:34 -0700
Peter Sayer, Computerworld, 30 Aug 2016
Apple must repay up to the equivalent of US$14.5 billion in underpaid taxes
in Ireland, the European Commission ruled on 30 Aug 2016.  Two Irish tax
rulings constituted illegal state aid, the European Commission ruled.
http://www.computerworld.com/article/3113753/it-industry/apple-must-repay-145-billion-in-underpaid-taxes-in-ireland.html

selected text [PGN-ed]:

Apple's tax benefits in Ireland are illegal, and the company will have to
pay up to the equivalent of roughly US$14.5 billion in back taxes, plus
interest.  The investigation found that Apple's effective tax rate on profit
reported in Ireland was just 1/2000, falling to 1/20000 in 2014.  Apple and
the Irish tax authority disputed the commission's charges.

Vestager said that Irish tax authorities had allowed Apple to split profit
from the two companies, which were subject to normal taxes, with "head
office" companies that were subject to no taxes, either in Ireland or
elsewhere.  "Splitting the profits did not have any factual or economic
justification. The so-called head office had no employees, no premises, no
real activities," she said. Those head-office companies were allocated
almost all the profits.  This selective tax treatment in Ireland is illegal
under European Union state aid rules, she said, and distorts competition.


How Tech Giants Are Devising Real Ethics for Artificial Intelligence (John Markoff)

"ACM TechNews" <technews-editor@acm.org>
Fri, 2 Sep 2016 12:26:33 -0400 (EDT)
John Markoff, *The New York Times*, 1 Sep 2016 [in the 2 Sep paper], via ACM
TechNews, Friday, September 2, 2016

Researchers from Alphabet, Amazon, Facebook, IBM, and Microsoft are forming
an alliance to establish an ethical standard for artificial intelligence
(AI) development.  Four people involved in the alliance's foundation say the
group's intent is to make sure AI research is focused on societal benefits
and not harm.  One of the group's executives, Microsoft researcher Eric
Horvitz, recipient of the 2015 ACM AAAI Allen Newell Award, sponsors a
Stanford University group that on Thursday issued a report underscoring the
value of the industry effort.  The report's authors warn it will be
impossible to regulate AI, "since there is no clear definition of AI (it
isn't any one thing), and the risks and considerations are very different in
different domains."  Study co-author and University of Texas at Austin
researcher Peter Stone recommends boosting awareness of and expertise about
AI at all levels of government.  Both the AI industry group and a proposed
initiative at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) seek to
investigate AI's social and economic implications, with the latter
discussing the design of new AI and robotic systems with "society in the
loop."  "What we want to do is support and reinforce the social scientists
who are doing research which will play a role in setting policies," says MIT
Media Lab director Joichi Ito.
http://orange.hosting.lsoft.com/trk/click?ref=znwrbbrs9_6-1104cx2fb31x072199&


"Kawasaki developing AI motorcycles that can talk with, learn from their riders" (Casey Baseel)

Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net>
Mon, 29 Aug 2016 21:32:56 -0700
Casey Baseel, RocketNews24, 29 Aug 2016
http://en.rocketnews24.com/2016/08/28/kawasaki-developing-ai-motorcycles-that-can-talk-with-learn-from-their-riders/

selected text:

Through continued communication, the bike will learn the owner's amount of
motorcycle experience, skill level, and individual riding style.  But what's
likely to have a more direct effect on the riding experience is a planned
feature in which after developing a profile of the rider, various vehicle
settings will automatically be adjusted accordingly.

  [While there are advantages, what happens if someone borrows a configured
  bike?]


You Can Now Chat With Your Hotel Room, and It's Only Going to Get Better (Bloomberg)

Gabe Goldberg <gabe@gabegold.com>
Tue, 30 Aug 2016 23:53:12 -0400
Last Wednesday, Starwood's tech-centric hotel brand, Aloft unveiled its
top-secret [*] Project Jetson. Now, for the first time, hotel guests can
talk to their rooms, thanks to the help of Apple's ubiquitous voice-powered
assistant, Siri.
http://www.bloomberg.com/Research/stocks/private/snapshot.asp?privcapid=7685157

  Siri, raise the temperature to 68 degrees, or, Siri, turn out the bathroom
  light, a guest might say -” if they were staying at Aloft's Boston Seaport
  locations, where Project Jetson is currently piloting.  or Santa Clara.

http://www.starwoodhotels.com/alofthotels/property/overview/index.html?propertyID=4142&language=en_US
http://www.aloftsantaclara.com/

  Depending on your outlook regarding hospitality, that may seem unnecessary
  or frivolous—or scarily futuristic. But maybe you've already learned
  first-hand that when most of these functions are embedded on bedside
  tablet devices, they quickly get buggy with age. Or maybe you've gotten
  into a tightly tucked bed after a long day of meetings, only to find that
  a light is still on and there's no way to turn it off remotely. Then you
  know that Project Jetson isn't just about technology for technology's
  sake; it's about making your hotel room more intuitive.

I hope it's more deterministic than my car's voice control, only selectively
understanding my verbal commands. On a good day I can change radio stations
or turn on rear window defroster. On a bad day, anything I haven't requested
can happen. I can't wait to experience that suspense and excitement in a
voice-controlled self-driving car. Or even hotel room.

Plus, of course—the walls will always be listening. I had that experience
recently—ending phone call, iPad across room. I said "Thanks for your
help" and iPad responded politely with something like "You're welcome". I'm
sure Project Jetson will archive/analyze what it hears purely for analysis
and improvement and will maintain complete confidentiality. The fact that
"privacy" doesn't appear in the article must be just an oversight.

Gabriel Goldberg, Computers and Publishing, Inc.       gabe@gabegold.com
3401 Silver Maple Place, Falls Church, VA 22042           (703) 204-0433

  [* top-secret Project Jetson unveiled?  Maybe, certainly not Top Secret,
  and actually not very secret at all.  PGN]


AP Computer Science Principles Course Aims to Attract More Students to the Field (Amy Golod)

"ACM TechNews" <technews-editor@acm.org>
Fri, 2 Sep 2016 12:26:33 -0400 (EDT)
Amy Golod, *U.S. News and World Report*, 31 Aug 2016, via ACM TechNews,
Friday, September 2, 2016

The College Board's new advanced placement (AP) Computer Science Principles
course will introduce computer science and programming fundamentals to
U.S. high school students, with a focus on collaboration and creativity.
Unlike the existing AP Computer Science A course, the new course will not
require previous knowledge of programming languages and technology, and it
is aimed at making computing accessible to underrepresented demographics.
Students will be exposed to a variety of applications and programming
languages through project-based learning.  In addition to algorithms and
programming, the course will concentrate on the global effects of computing
and the ethical usage of data.  "We're focusing not just on the knowledge we
want students to have, but the practices and experiences we want them to
have before they leave the course," says the College Board's Richard Kick.
Now that a three-year pilot program has concluded, Computer Science
Principles will launch in the fall and consist of two projects and a final
exam.  For one project, students will use a digital medium to explain the
development of a computer science application; for the second project,
students will build an app using a programming language of their choice.
The project-based approach is intended to engage classes filled with
students who have varying levels of programming experience.
http://orange.hosting.lsoft.com/trk/click?ref=znwrbbrs9_6-1104cx2fb36x072199&


Feist vs Paxfire

"Peter G. Neumann" <neumann@csl.sri.com>
Tue, 30 Aug 2016 10:36:42 PDT
If you delete your cookies and Internet history, are you willfully
destroying material evidence?

* Besty Feist alleges Paxfire intentionally intercepted her communications
  in violation of the Wiretap Act.
* Paxfire claims she cleared her Internet history, which would have allowed
  them to refute her allegations.
* Feist argues that Paxfire does not need her Internet history to defend
  against the allegations because this action is about Paxfire's policies
  and practices, not merely specific instances of interception and
  redirection.

Ronald L. Ellis, U.S. Magistrate Judge delivered a somewhat Solomonic mixed
ruling, Paxfire's motion is Granted in Part and Denied in Part.
Case 1:11-cv-05436-LGS-RLE   [Starkly PGN-ed]

Thanks to Andrew Grosso for noting this case.


Beyond CAPTCHAs to frustration

Jeremy Epstein <jeremy.j.epstein@gmail.com>
Wed, 31 Aug 2016 13:17:17 -0400
Choice Hotels (www.choicehotels.com) is using some of the more advanced
CAPTCHAs - e.g., "which of these pictures has a house number".  Today I've
run into a new version which has me completely stumped - a large image
broken into squares, and the question "which of these blocks has a street
sign".  The street signs are frequently split across multiple blocks, and
they're not necessarily American or international standards (e.g., one had
signs in Chinese, but I don't know if those are street signs).  So I'm in
the position of trying to figure out what an image recognition system thinks
is a street sign - e.g., is a small street sign at an oblique angle
something it will recognize?  What if it's the name of a street where some
of the letters are in one block and others in another?  How about a vertical
sign that spans several blocks, where the bottom part of the sign is just a
solid color - does that count?  I've encountered all of these and many more
edge cases in the past few minutes.

After about 10 tries, I have been unsuccessful at getting logged in.  I
wonder if they track the failure rate?

The RISK is that a clever algorithm (in this case image recognition) that a
human is presumed to be able to understand (but a computerized system is
not) may be too smart for its own good.


How One GMO Nearly Took Down the Planet

Gabe Goldberg <gabe@gabegold.com>
Wed, 31 Aug 2016 16:53:43 -0400
On July 29, President Obama signed bill S.764 into law, dealing a major blow
to the movement to require GMO labeling. The new law, which food safety
groups call the "Deny Americans the Right to Know" (DARK) Act, has at least
three key parts that undermine Vermont's popular GMO labeling bill and make
it nearly impossible for Americans to know what's in their food. [...]

In the early 1990s, a European genetic engineering company was preparing to
field test its genetically modified version of /Klebsiella planticola/,
which it had tested in the lab and presumed to be safe. But if it weren't
for the work of a team of independent scientists led by Elaine Ingham, that
company could have literally killed every terrestrial plant on the planet.

http://www.alternet.org/food/how-one-gmo-nearly-took-down-planet

Extreme? Exaggerated? Valid? Can't tell. But legislating against providing
information seems inherently suspicious behavior. Right up there with
"Nothing to see here, move along."


Re: They really did remove the streets from Google Maps (Jacobson, RISKS-29.73)

Al Stangenberger <forags@sbcglobal.net>
Thu, 1 Sep 2016 11:53:45 -0700
Google Maps' de-emphasis of streets is (in my opinion) an improvement for
users traveling rural roads, where road condition is crucial.  Their
previous presentation often showed "roads" which were nothing more than two
tire tracks through a grassy field.  Even in satellite view, their previous
intense white lines often hid the actual condition of the road from view.

Please report problems with the web pages to the maintainer

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